Question: Can I Know Who Am I Talking To?

Who am I talking with meaning?

It is generally considered ‘incorrect’ or at least badly mixed register to insist on the object pronoun ‘whom’ when it is not preceded by the preposition: ‘Whom am I speaking with’ is an attempt to be formal, but the terminal preposition in and of itself sets the sentence as informal..

Who do I love or whom I love?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

What is difference between which and that?

“That” is used to indicate a specific object, item, person, condition, etc., while “which” is used to add information to objects, items, people, situations, etc. Because “which” indicates a non-restrictive (optional) clause, it is usually set off by commas before “which” and at the end of the clause.

What is a defining clause?

A defining clause looks to the noun modified and singles it out among others that could exist in the context. A defining clause points a finger at the noun modified and says, “that noun, not any others named by that noun.” A defining clause begins with the relative pronoun that and is not set off by commas.

Who am I talking to or whom am I talking to?

In formal English, “to whom am I speaking” would be correct. “Whom” is the objective form of “who,” and “whom” is the object of the preposition “to” in the sentence “to whom am I speaking?”. However, here in the USA at least, we usually refrain from using the most formal kind of English in ordinary conversation.

Who or whom may I ask is calling?

In normal order, the clause reads “we are calling whom.” It should read, “Whom are you calling?” Sentence 7 correctly employs whomever as the object of its own clause, “Whomever we elect for president.” The subject is we, the verb is elect, and the direct object is whomever.

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

Who is VS that is?

As a general rule of thumb use “who” in the singular person, and use “who” and “that” where appropriate in the plural person. But never use “who” to indicate an object/subject, instead use “that” for that purpose.

Do you speak to someone or with someone?

“To speak with” someone has the connotation that there is a conversation, that two people are talking together. “To speak to” someone connotes the possibility of one person talking at another, as in in a reprimand, senior to junior or authority figure to subordinate. “To speak with” is the friendlier version.